The National Museum of Art of Romania

Eli Lotar (1905 - 1969)

The exhibition is part of the 2019 France-Romania Season.

Programme co-ordinator: Ioan Cristescu, Director of the National Museum of Romanian Literature
The Art Collections Museum
111, Calea Victoriei
18 April – 14 July 2019
Visiting hours: Saturday to Wednesday, 10.00 to 18.00.
Last admission: 17.00.
Free: every first Wednesday of the month

 The Eli Lotar (1905-1969) retrospective exhibition is the first in Romania to bring centre stage the work of this French photographer and filmmaker of Romanian origin. The selection retraces his contribution to Parisian avant-garde through more than 150 vintage photographs and negatives, films, book and magazine pages, as well as letters.

Born in Paris but raised in Romania by his father, poet and journalist Tudor Arghezi, Eli Lotar (Eliazar Lotar Teodorescu) returned to the “city of lights” in 1924. Not yet 25, he published photographs in magazines such as “VU”, “Jazz” and “Arts et métiers graphiques” and participated in major international exhibitions like “Film und Foto”, “Fotografie der Gegenwart” and “„Documents de la vie sociale”. The photographs and films he made capture the vibe of the Parisian night-life through backstage images of the famous Blackbirds shows featuring Afro-American dancers, the grim sadness of hospitals and slaughter houses, the strange reality of secluded areas in contemporary Spain, the harsh urban perspectives of cities demolished during the Second World War along more poetic Mediterranean landscapes and views of archaeological sites in Greece in the 1930s. Images dating back to 1944, when he shared a room with sculptor Alberto Giacometti in a Swiss hotel, acting as his model while also photographing the latter’s works, form a chapter apart within this varied selection.

Produced by Jeu de Paume and Centre Pompidou (which hosted it) in 2017, the Eli Lotar retrospective exhibition currently open at the Art Collections Museum highlights the creation of a lesser-known yet major artist whose framing, compositional rhythm and interest in lighting effects played a major part in shaping the modernism typical of the 1930s photography and film.

The exhibition is part of the 2019 France-Romania Season.

Programme co-ordinator: Ioan Cristescu, Director of the National Museum of Romanian Literature
The Art Collections Museum
111, Calea Victoriei
18 April – 14 July 2019
Visiting hours: Saturday to Wednesday, 10.00 to 18.00.
Last admission: 17.00.
Free: every first Wednesday of the month