Muzeul Naţional de Artă al României
QUEEN MARIE AND THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN CERAMICS IN GREATER ROMANIA

QUEEN MARIE AND THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN CERAMICS IN GREATER ROMANIA

De la 15 Decembrie 2018 10:00 până la 07 Iulie 2019 18:00
Vizualizări: 195

As early as 1859 when the Romanian Principalities of Wallachia and Moldavia united, intellectuals, artists and politicians eagerly supported the development of a national style. They found a dedicated ally in Queen Marie who, upon the formation of Greater Romania in the aftermath of World War Two enthusiastically embraced and promoted the idea by giving a strong personal. The interior decoration programme at work in all royal residences, be they official or private, including her own, made extensive use of elements pertaining to the plastic and decorative vocabulary developed throughout the Romanian provinces.

Within this broader context ceramics enjoyed Queen Marie’s particular support, manifest in the establishment at Periș of a workshop under folk master Gh. Boboc. Tasteful and creative, Queen Marie set a strong personal example and thus helped shape a new perception of folk art and all related art forms among wide audiences.

Products of the urban ceramics workshops in Bucharest (‘Troița’), Băneasa (led by Gh. Niculescu), Satu Mare (D.A.C., created by painter Aurel Popp), Turda (Tompa Brothers) were widely spread in Romanian inter-war homes. Prestigious artists such as Camil Ressu, Nicolae Tonitza, Ștefan Dimitrescu, Petru Remus Troteanu, Gh. Ionescu-Doru, and Nora Steriadi produced prototypes or painted various pieces based on original models, thus contributing to the success rate of these workshops. Unfortunately their fortune was rather short-lived due to the economic depression of 1928 - 1930 followed by the Second World War.

An exhibition supported by the Ministry of Culture and National Identity on the occasion of the Great Union Centennial.

The Rotonda Hall, Știrbei Vodă Street entrance
15 December 2018 to 7 July 2019
Visiting hours: Wednesday to Sunday, 10.00 -18.00
Free entrance